Summer 2017

CHESAPEAKE BAY JOURNEYS

EXPLORE • RELAX • CONSERVE

Franklin Point’s beauty plain as the eye can see

Franklin Point’s beauty plain as the eye can see

In Walter Neitzey’s four decades as a flight instructor and operator of Deep Creek Airport on the shore of the Chesapeake Bay 10 miles south of Annapolis, he probably never once looked down from his cockpit at the bucolic airfield below and thought it might some day be part of a nice state park.

T.F. Sayles
Terrapin park shows importance of access to the Bay

Terrapin park shows importance of access to the Bay

The Terrapin Nature Area in Stevensville, MD, reminds me why I’ve committed my career to conservation. This gorgeous park hides in plain sight on Kent Island, waving to everyone traveling eastward over the Bay Bridge, and offers so much to its visitors.

Joel Dunn
Yorktown museum puts Revolution in context

Yorktown museum puts Revolution in context

The end that led to our beginning

Anyone who paid attention in school can probably recall at least a few names, places and maybe a date from the Revolutionary War: George Washington, Lexington, Valley Forge, the Declaration of Independence, 1776. Now, a newly enhanced museum at Yorktown, VA, the site of the final battle in that founding conflict, offers Americans a fresh look at the nation’s complicated — some might say messy — beginning and how it has reverberated through the centuries.

Timothy B. Wheeler
Mountains seclude Cowans Gap

Mountains seclude Cowans Gap

So close, yet so far away

From my campsite, I could hear coyotes calling in the mountains, as well as the eerie cry of a loon from the lake.

But I wasn’t in a remote mountain hideaway far beyond the Chesapeake region. I was camping in a Pennsylvania state park, barely two hours from downtown Washington, DC.

Karl Blankenship
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Handsell braids stories of those who lived there

Handsell braids stories of those who lived there

A confluence of land and people

Along Indiantown Road, on the outskirts of Vienna, MD, there is a place called Handsell, where three histories come together to tell tales of Maryland’s earliest peoples.

Handsell is a tidy brick house that sits on two acres of land amid farm fields edged by forest. The woods border Chicone Creek, a pretty, burbling waterway that can accommodate kayaks at high tide. But Handsell is also the name of the whole property, which now includes a restored house, a re-created Indian dwelling, a path to the creek, and a view of farmland in all directions.

Rona Kobell
A cool way to experience the James

A cool way to experience the James

Park yourself in a tube, let the river do the driving

If you find yourself hankering for relief from summer heat — and who doesn’t? — consider finding a tube and floating down a river.

Leslie Middleton
Fort Hunter showcases centuries along the Susquehanna

Fort Hunter showcases centuries along the Susquehanna

Fort Hunter Mansion and Park is a historic riverfront center along the Susquehanna River in Harrisburg. But its name is misleading.

You won’t find a fort. It existed in colonial times, but no longer. You will find a mansion and a park, but also a a lot more than that.

Donna Morelli
Meander through Parkers Creek Preserve

Meander through Parkers Creek Preserve

Pristine paths and watery wilderness

Thirty years ago, a group of scientists and preservationists pooled their resources to save a pristine forest abutting the Chesapeake Bay from a future of golf courses, marinas and subdivisions.

The result is Parkers Creek Preserve, a 3,500-acre wonder in Calvert County on Maryland’s Western Shore. Just off MD Route 2/4, this expanse includes 22 miles of public hiking trails meandering through forested uplands and fragile marshes, past tall cordgrass and scrubby marsh flowers. There are majestic views of the ancient shoreline cliffs, which frame the winding creek as it spills across a narrow beach into the open Chesapeake Bay.

Rona Kobell
Valliant and Associates